Nº. 1 of  12

Is le Grima mo chroí anois.

Pleased to meet you. You can call me Variety. This tumblr is a miscellaneous jumble of things, including lots of art and fandom ramblings. For more about me and what you can expect me to post, see this post
I also have a fanfic tag and a TF2 side-blog.
And, of course, feel free to ask me anything.
AIM: ladygyr (All lowercase.) Steam: VarietyShow
Timezone: Central European
I love video games and cultural criticism.

Currently full of spoilers for Fire Emblem: Awakening.

FE13 tag is "Roan and the Emblem Enigmas".

Posts tagged lgbtq:

I gave a speech on bisexual health at a medical association conference a few years ago. One of the attendees, who is a mental health professional — he’s a therapist — wasn’t at my talk, but when he heard the topic of my speech, he told me, "Oh, when I have clients who say they’re bi, I really question it. I really make them talk it through, and we examine it very closely."

I said, "What if they say they’re gay?" He was gay, by the way.

He said, "Oh, in that case, we just talk about whatever they came to me for."

Amy Andre in Nothing About Us Without Us from her speech on problems of Physical Health in the Bisexual Community, at a bisexual roundtable on 23 September 2013 in Washington DC USA (via bialogue-group)

It’s this shit right here that gets me so fucking mad at people who trivialise biphobia and monosexism by saying shit like “oh the worst you get is people thinking you are confused and greedy”, as if those stereotypes has no real consequences for bisexuals.

This is a fucking therapist, a man in charge of helping people overcome mental health issues and trauma, admitting freely that he and his colleagues treat bisexuality as if it is a mental health problem and a symptom of mental disturbance to be treated and cured.

He is telling a bi woman that he does treat gay people the same way and I’m pretty sure that he doesn’t treat straight folks that way, he is singling out bisexuals because he thinks there is something wrong with us identifying that way, because we are, in his mind, confused.

It makes me sick to think that he is making clients doubt and dissect their own sexuality, blamed their bisexuality for their mental state, told them that bisexuality was a symptom or something to take centre-stage over everything because he thinks it’s not as natural or mentally healthy as monosexuality.

This attitude towards bisexuality is endemic to the medical health industry, especially mental health, which is already a problematic field given how much stigma is attached to mental illness.

So many times I hear bisexuals express their anger at being told by qualified therapists and doctors that they were confused, greedy and/or unstable and therefore had to jump through pointless hoops, longer and more invasive therapy sessions, or even worse, threatened with having treatment withheld or taken in a direction completely different from monosexuals because “it’s all in their heads” or “just doing it for attention”. All because the person in charge takes Freud a little too seriously and/or believes all the shitty stereotypes that seem ever so trivial and not worth combatting to biphobia-deniers.

And people wonder why bisexuals don’t come out to health professionals? They wonder why we don’t come out at all? They wonder why bisexuals have a rate of suicide and poor health way above straight and gay people?

Don’t ever tell me that is trivial. Bisexuals die because of these stereotypes, they are killed by these so-called mental health professionals telling them that they need to be cured by denying themselves and are erased after death by monosexism. Fuck everyone who doesn’t think that’s worth caring about. 

(via a-little-bi-furious)

Small reminder of WHY we need out informed Bisexual People at ALL LGBT Health Conferences

(via bisexual-community)

I had this happen to me more than once with therapists. I call ahead now to actually ask: are you bi and poly friendly? Because if you’re not, I’m not interested.

(via vaspider)

(via rexwhildchild)

embroideredcupcake:

Damn straight there’s a Bisexual Agenda.

It’s to replace all cars with trained pterodactyls by 2025.

(via rexwhildchild)

fightingfirewithfrostbite:

"I guess asexuals can be in the community but heteroromantic asexuals are too much"

When have you ever seen a heteromantic asexual demand a place in queer spaces

When have you ever seen a heteroromantic asexual talk about anything but their experiences being ASEXUAL

When have you ever seen a heteroromantic asexual demand a place or the right to call themselves queer because they were heteroromantic and not because they were fucking ASEXUAL

Heteroromantic asexuals have never posed any threat to any non-heterosexual community. They are an extremely small part of an already extremely small group and are relatively quiet and silent even on issues that deal with their asexuality.

A person’s romantic orientation does not cancel out or negate a persons sexual orientation.

Stop trying to pretend you aren’t acephobic.

SUPPORT ASEXUALS, NO IFS ANDS OR BUTS.

(via wickedwix)

Speaking of sober spaces for LGBTQ youth, the work that BeLonG To do is SO important. They list and run youth groups (often weekly) across the country.

I’ve never actually been to the Cork one, because when I was younger I was far too closeted and also generally afraid to visit The Other Place (which is a bit sad considering it could have helped a lot), but it’s super great that the youth groups are an initiative that are going on all over the country, not just in the capital.

And where are the sober spaces? We often talk about “building safer spaces”, and yet our fundraisers are not safe for people that have a current or past history with addiction. They are not safe for people that have experienced abuse because of alcohol/drug dependent partners or family members. And they are definitely not safe for everyone if there is a possibility of police interference. Consent violations also occur more often in non-sober spaces. Don’t we want to ensure the safety of event participants after the event has ended? Including alcohol limits who can attend, what conversations can occur, and who wants to organize. These events usually end with no advancement of our movements, and do not build long lasting, genuine connections.

I am interested in building and sustaining more sober spaces, bridging intergenerational gaps (especially in the queer community), and being accessible to ALL peoples, not just college kids. I am tired of people throwing around the word “community”, when what we really mean is our close group of (amazing and supportive) friends and acquaintances.

An Open Letter to Young Organizers by Yucca (via ok4rj)

(via rexwhildchild)

g3ng4r:

more sober spaces for young queers

(via saffronsugar)

The Government is set to pass an amendment to employment law to ensure religious-run schools or hospitals cannot dismiss staff on such grounds as being a lone parent or a divorcee, or on the basis of sexual orientation. (source)

YEAHHHHHHHH.

fuckyeahlesbianliterature:

[image description: the covers of the books listed below]

diversityinya:

10 Recent Contemporary LGBTQ YA Books

In honor of Pride month, here are 10 YA books about contemporary LGBT experiences just published this year. If you haven’t had a chance to check them out yet, now’s a great time!

(via hoganddice)

Talking Gender with Tiny Humans

fandom-shenanigans:

watchtheswitch:

During last week’s lgbtq+ policy meeting, a sentiment came up that I’ve heard many times before:

"How would I explain this transgender stuff to my child? He’s only seven, there’s no way he’d understand!"

'Concerned parents' often suggest that transgender identity and gender non-conformity are impossible topics to discuss with a young child.

Here’s the thing: kids are smart, and talking with them about gender is super easy. If you’re not sure where to start, this post is a primer. 

Read More

And the thing is, the entire world is confusing to kids. That’s the whole thing about being kids - learning as you go. So if you just introduce this stuff as just another fact about the world, it’s not going to be a big deal. It’s just another little bit of info that kids will fit into their brains. Same for sex, sexuality, gender, any topic ever in the world. It’s really only a big confusing deal if you make it a big confusing deal. The biggest things kids learn is how to react to topics based on how you/adults handle them.

(via queeroticomics)

gailsimone:

glassgears:

It can be really frustrating working on the comics sometimes.
There’s a large, vocal audience declaring how much they want to see more diversity in comics and more LGBTQ characters. I was one of them, even. And it’s why I made The Pride.
However, when an indie project comes out with just that, a lot of this audience don’t actually buy the product they’d been calling out for: because it’s not from Marvel or DC.

Fact is though, if an audience doesn’t prove a desire and market for such a product, they won’t be willing to take a risk on creating one of their own. 
Obviously, I’m small press. I self-publish. I pay to get the comics made out of my own pocket. At the moment, there’s still around £5000 to pay artists for work and get the rest of the series printed when it comes to it. This isn’t even taking into account the cost of postage etc…it’s hard work, and takes up a lot of my time and money.

But it’s a labor of love, so I keep working at it. I wouldn’t change that for the world. But I do wish that I was able to pay the artists faster and could afford printing easier.
The Pride has 841 Likes on Facebook. If all of them bought just one copy of The Pride digital issues (at just £1.50), any issue, that would raise a massive chunk needed towards paying off the remaining artists! It would literally fund itself. I wouldn’t make any money myself, but I don’t care about that. This project is as much about building my profile and name as a writer than it is about getting rich…I will never get rich off The Pride, but I love doing it.
Likes are all well and good, honestly they are great and a massive help in their own right, but it doesn’t help me actually make the comics. And it’s frustrating to see this market, this audience, saying they want a product and then just…not.

Just felt like sharing that is all. In case anyone is considering making comics of their own. Obviously, I don’t want to scare anyone off: you wanna make comics, make comics. But be prepared for hard times and struggles, but if you work hard it could well all be worth it in the end.
And of course, if you do want to buy The Pride, you can do so here.


I really do recommend this book, it’s absolutely a pleasure to read and a clear labor of love.

gailsimone:

glassgears:

It can be really frustrating working on the comics sometimes.

There’s a large, vocal audience declaring how much they want to see more diversity in comics and more LGBTQ characters. I was one of them, even. And it’s why I made The Pride.

However, when an indie project comes out with just that, a lot of this audience don’t actually buy the product they’d been calling out for: because it’s not from Marvel or DC.

Fact is though, if an audience doesn’t prove a desire and market for such a product, they won’t be willing to take a risk on creating one of their own. 

Obviously, I’m small press. I self-publish. I pay to get the comics made out of my own pocket. At the moment, there’s still around £5000 to pay artists for work and get the rest of the series printed when it comes to it. This isn’t even taking into account the cost of postage etc…it’s hard work, and takes up a lot of my time and money.

But it’s a labor of love, so I keep working at it. I wouldn’t change that for the world. But I do wish that I was able to pay the artists faster and could afford printing easier.

The Pride has 841 Likes on Facebook. If all of them bought just one copy of The Pride digital issues (at just £1.50), any issue, that would raise a massive chunk needed towards paying off the remaining artists! It would literally fund itself. I wouldn’t make any money myself, but I don’t care about that. This project is as much about building my profile and name as a writer than it is about getting rich…I will never get rich off The Pride, but I love doing it.

Likes are all well and good, honestly they are great and a massive help in their own right, but it doesn’t help me actually make the comics. And it’s frustrating to see this market, this audience, saying they want a product and then just…not.

Just felt like sharing that is all. In case anyone is considering making comics of their own. Obviously, I don’t want to scare anyone off: you wanna make comics, make comics. But be prepared for hard times and struggles, but if you work hard it could well all be worth it in the end.

And of course, if you do want to buy The Pride, you can do so here.

I really do recommend this book, it’s absolutely a pleasure to read and a clear labor of love.

Nº. 1 of  12